Put up or shut up

There is No Best Tool

Courtesy:  Amir Khella

Switching to a new tool or programming language when starting a new project can dramatically increase chances of failure because it introduces more unknowns into the process, and eventually delays the journey from idea to a launched product. It’s the best form of “productive procrastination”: doing something that seems to be contributing to the project’s progress, while it actually has very little to do with it.

Professionals seem to know this rule much better than beginners. They learn, sometimes the hard way, that switching and upgrading to the best new thing doesn’t usually translate to better work. I know some bestselling authors who haven’t upgraded their laptops for the past 10 years, and a few amazing cartoonists who still use Flash MX 6 to do their artwork.

As Hugh Macleod puts it: “Fancy tools are just pillars to hide behind”.

So instead of asking: “what’s the best tool or language for a new project”, try asking yourself: “how can I use what I already know to get it done soon”. Even if you end up doing it in a crude way the first time around, it doesn’t matter. The goal is to first get it done, then get it right; To minimize time and friction from idea to execution.

 

 

 

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